Accessible Gaming Quarterly on Kickstarter for a Short Time

Accessible Gaming Quarterly Kickstarter Banner

We’ve been really quiet around here since our unsuccessful first attempt at the Survival of the Able Kickstarter. Although it didn’t fund the first time around, we are planning a re-launch next month through a collaboration with Broken Ruler Games. More on that development later.

Today, we just launched a Kickstarter campaign through their Zine Quest initiative to bring you a magazine called Accessible Gaming Quarterly. This zine features a host of contributors who each have something unique to say about accessibility and disability as they relate to the RPG hobby.

Here’s a brief overview of what will be included in each of the four issues:

Review: Power Outage RPG

 

Power Outage CoverGame Info

Publisher: Go Nerdy

Writing: Bebarce El-Tayib

Year Published: 2019

Pages: 190

Visit the Power Outage page on RPGGeek.

 

 

Introduction

There are a lot of kid-friendly RPGs on the market. Just check out this list of them on RPGGeek. To my knowledge, however, there is only one RPG designed specifically for kids which also was designed as a guide for parents and educators of children with disabilities. That honorable distinction goes to Power Outage, a new game by Bebarce El-Tayib. Naturally, when I first heard about this game I knew I had to get my hands on it. I needed to see what others were doing in terms of accessible games, and the promise of a super hero themed RPG designed …
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Having a Learning Disability and Teaching Games

Learning Disabled and Teaching Tabletop Games is a great article written by James Cole and featured on The Geeky Gimp. IN the article, James talks about his gift of being a great board game teacher and how his experience with having a learning disability has shaped that skill.

I particularly like how James talks about different types of learners, including visual, aural, and kinesthetic learners. Like James, I have taken a few courses on adult learning theory and picked up a lot of useful information about how to work with people who have various learning styles and needs.

James also adds some great points about knowing your audience, teaching to their level, and picking the right game for the right group.

Whether or not you have a disability, there’s a lot of great information in this article about how to teach tabletop games to new players. I recommend you take a …
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Dragon Plus Article Obscures D&D Accessibility Issues

It has been almost seven months since I last wrote for the blog. A lot has happened since then, including a cross-country move from Oregon to Kentucky. That doesn’t mean my website, my design, or my ideas are dead–they’ve just been dormant for a while. Now it’s time to start getting things rolling again.

Recently I started talks with a local group about starting up a family-friendly Dungeons and Dragons group. I haven’t played much D&D in a long time, and that is in small part due to its inaccessibility. When the D&D 5e Basic Set came out in PDF several years ago, I ran into considerable barriers trying to access and read it. Couple that with the fact that Wizards of the Coast doesn’t release their core 5e products in PDF, and that led me to be completely disinterested in the game. After all, why should I jump through hoops …
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Global Accessibility Awareness Day

Today (May 17th, 2018) is Global Accessibility Awareness Day. I thought it would be a great time to reflect on how far we’ve come as an industry and how far we still have to go.

When I started the Accessible Games blog back in 2010, my primary goal was to review board games and talk about their accessibility (or lack thereof). The idea was to spotlight those games which are easily adapted for people with disabilities (PWDs) and to mention which games should probably be avoided for people with certain disabilities.

As the years progressed, I started to grow frustrated with common accessibility issues. I gravitated more toward roleplaying games because they simply required less effort to adapt for my personal needs. They also offered me lots of hours of enjoyment without the need to adapt every new game that came my way. A few modifications to an RPG of choice was …
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Modifier Podcast Episodes about Accessibility

I recently came upon the Modifier Podcast, part of the One Shot Podcast Network. To date, the podcast has featured two episodes about accessibility in gaming which everyone should check out.

Episode 1 is an interview with Elsa S. Henry, designer of Dead Scare and the upcoming Fate Accessibility Toolkit. If that name sounds familiar to you, it may be because you saw the Diversity+ panel I shared with her and others (or you may know her from any number of other reasons).

Episode 19 is an interview with two other podcasters, one of whom is blind. They talk a great deal about games, game aids, conventions, and various other accessibility topics.

So far I’m fond of everything I’ve listened to on this podcast and will definitely be following it in the future. Hats off to Meghan Dornbrock for a fantastic show.

What Does Accessibility Mean to You?

This entry is part of 1 in the seriesRPG Blog Carnival

RPG Bloggers Carnival BannerThis month I’ll be hosting the RPG  Blog Carnival, a blogging tradition going back to 2008. This month’s topic? Accessibility in Games, of course.

Throughout the month of March, I’d encourage you to really think about what accessibility in gaming means to you. It may mean different things to different people: equal access for people with disabilities, inclusiveness in game design and representation of people from diverse backgrounds, family-friendly gaming with a welcoming vibe, etc.

The Accessible Games motto is “Games for absolutely everyone.” To me, that pretty much means all of the above.

If you’re familiar with this blog, you’ll know that I often talk about how to make RPGs more accessible to people who use screen readers and …
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International Day of Persons with Disabilities – Sale

accessiblegamesThursday, December 3rd, is the United Nations International Day of Persons with Disabilities. To celebrate, and to bring awareness to gamers with disabilities, we’re selling all of our PDFs for 50% off from DriveThruRPG.

The theme for this year is Inclusion matters: access and empowerment for people of all abilities.

“The right to participate in public life is essential to create stable democracies, active citizenship and reduce inequalities in society.”
Source: UN.org

It’s every individual’s responsibility to be inclusive of people from all walks of life. As gamers, we’ve been exposed to a lot of discussion about the rights of women and people of color–and to be sure, discussion of those rights is absolutely imperative–but we don’t often talk about the rights …
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Style Guide for Writing About People with Disabilities

I recently came upon this helpful style guide for writing about people with disabilities. It’s geared toward members of the press, but useful for anyone who might be writing about disabilities in general.

Link: NCDJ Style Guide

The style guide has a helpful A to Z list of common terms, their backgrounds, and recommendations for how to use them when referring to people with disabilities. There are a couple of common themes among their recommendations:

Accessible PDFs with InDesign Alternatives

This entry is part 15 of 17 in the seriesTutorials

Introduction

I have offered a lot of tutorials about how to use Adobe InDesign CS6 to make accessible PDFs. It’s industry standard for a reason, but it’s also really expensive. Even with the new, more affordable Creative Cloud option, InDesign can seem out of reach for a small press publisher who’s on a budget.

In “How to Choose Layout Software,” I mentioned a few InDesign alternatives. Scribus is a free and open source layout program that is powerful, if not the most intuitive. Affinity Publisher is a low-cost alternative that isn’t quite as full-featured as InDesign, but it will get the job done for a fraction of the cost. More recently, I discovered LucidPress, a free web-based layout program, as well.

If you’re using one of these alternatives, you shouldn’t feel left out. Though I don’t have a lot of hands-on experience with these programs, I have compiled a …
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